Software :: Change Umask Of User ?

Jan 7, 2010

I have a daemon running as a local user account on my red hat box. The problem is the daemon creates directories using a umask of 022. I need group write access to the directories the daemon is creating. I need the daemon to use a umask of 002. I've edited the daemons startup script in /etc/init.d I've changed the umask in the /etc/init.d/functions file. I've added the line "umask 002" in the user's ~/.bashrc and ~/.bash_profile files. I've also setup /etc/bashrc to assign all users a 002 umask (just for kicks)

View 3 Replies


ADVERTISEMENT

Ubuntu :: Change Umask On Per User / Group Basis?

Mar 25, 2011

I've decided to move this question into a new thread since i haven't received an answer for 3 days. This question was originaly posted here: [URL]... I've already searched in google, however i wasn't able to find an answer that solves my problem... How can i change the umask on a per user basis so that each user can have its own umask to fit his needs? For example: I have four accounts on my system ex.

admin1 : admin,
admin2 : admin,
manager : stuff,
user : user,

-So now I want everything from the admin group to be by default set to 002 (so that every user that is in the admins group can have a full share (-rwx rwx r--) of everything that is created by the admins).

-Then the similar to the above managers shoud have 022 umask.

-And each of the regular users should have 002 or 022 or 077 it is up to the users choice.

I hope that i have provided enough info thorough the example.

View 4 Replies View Related

OpenSUSE Install :: Where To Set Umask For User

Oct 27, 2010

after installing openSuSE 11.3 i was thinking a bit about security. I read, it's a good idea to set umask of users to 077 . I'm unsure now, where to do this, cause there are different locations offered in the web:

/etc/login.defs
$HOME/.profile
/etc/profile - umask would be valid for root too.

And for my understanding:

- Is it wise to set root to umask 077 too or could this lead to negative effects on my system.

- Is it even senseless to umask the normal user to 077 if there is just one desktop-user using my system (myself ).

View 9 Replies View Related

General :: Umask Change ?

Jun 7, 2011

I have logged in with root user

My systems Umask value was 0022.

Code:

So i decided to change it to 0077 and observe the system for some time. so i edited /etc/profile and added

Code:

at the end of file

rebooted the machine.

But the umask is still showing as 0022

After the first attempt is failed I tried changing it using below command.

Code:

Validated it.

Code:

rebooted the machine but the umask is still showing 0022

So at last i have to modify /etc/bashrc file and add umask 077 at the end of the file.

How would i make it in general for all(Even for non-root user) and not just for bash prompt.

View 4 Replies View Related

Security :: Have To Change Umask Value?

Mar 5, 2010

I want to set permissions to a folder as rwx-r-x-r-x in such a way that whenever a new file or folder is created under it, it will automatically inherit the parent folders default permissions.So,what I need to do know, do I have to change the umask value??

View 5 Replies View Related

General :: Umask And Permissions - Has Umask 007 Bad Side Effects?

Mar 16, 2011

My Debian system has by default umask permissions of 0022, which I never liked. One user can read all the files of another seems very insecure to me.

I am planing to set it to 007, so that user and group have rw but all others have none.

Are there any side effects to that? I have noticed from a trial I did where I was changing permissions on the filesystem that some system stuff in the OS does not work anymore, if "others" have no read permission anymore, so that is why I am asking.

And why are chmod / umask permissions sometimes stated as 4 digits? What is this "all" group in the end? Isn't that already covered by "others"?

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Set Umask To 0000 For A Special User?

Jan 25, 2010

Please see below:

vim ~/.bashrc
umask=0000(bottom line)
source ~/.bashrc

But when I relogin, default umask was still 0022. How could I do ?

View 1 Replies View Related

Red Hat / Fedora :: Change Umask Value Permanently ?

Jun 16, 2009

How to change Umask value permanently for all user in Red hat Version

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Set Umask For Process Running Root User?

Nov 23, 2009

I am trying to set the umask for a process(orkaudio) which is running as the root user.This program creates dir and files and I need the umask to be 022. I have edited my /etc/bashrc -- and when i type in umask i get 0022 --- Not sure how to go about getting this resolved...

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Umask Change Not Taking Effect

Dec 28, 2009

I have 2 Oracle users that generate .tmp files under /var/tmp. By default, the files have the permissions 644. Now, a need has arisen whereby the files created by these users have to have the permission bits as 664. Obviously, I changed the UMASK value for these users from 022 to 02. But the files are still getting created with 644 as the permission.

I tried restarting the application as I read that a relogin is required for the UMASK change to take effect. Even that hasn't helped.

View 3 Replies View Related

Security :: Change Of Umask Values In Fedora 11

Feb 4, 2010

Recently I was going through some chmod manipulations and found the umask values to be 0002 by default in Fedora 11 distro. What I knew about the default values to be 022. I don't know whether this is a kernel modification in this distro or my system is in compromise(I doubt for the latter option, but not confirmed).

View 4 Replies View Related

General :: Setting User Mountpoint Permissions In Fstab Without Uid / Umask

Jan 30, 2010

I'm struggling to understand an aspect of mounting and mountpoints with /etc/fstab. There is a large number of sites and threads that make recommendations using things like uid, gid, umask, and other options. These methods, however, which I've used, are file-system specific, useful only for filesystems such as (V)FAT and NTFS that allow them.My current situation is that I am mounting partition /dev/sdb5 in, let's call it /media/myMount. My goals:Mount this partition automatically upon boot using /etc/fstab...The partition should be fully accessible only to a specific user or group.What I've done is create the mount point in /media:

If user michapma were to carry out the mount, I believe it would work; however, I want the mount to happen automatically during boot. So, how can I achieve my user (or group) permission goals for this and any other such partitions using fstab?The manpage for mount has been helpful, but after reading many tutorials and forum threads, the only way I know how to do it is to have the user do the mounting or rely on the file-system specific options.

View 2 Replies View Related

Ubuntu :: Change The UMASK For Users Who Log In On A LTSP Terminal?

Jun 25, 2010

I'm setting up an application server for a small organization using Ubuntu 10.04 and LTSP. We built a machine with a quad core Athlon II, got a Gigabit swtich, and a couple Gigabit ethernet cards. I burned gPXE into a couple EPROMs and turned their old PIII and Duron systems into thin clients.

So far so good.

Now, I'm trying to set up a shared directory that two users in the same group can both read and write. Let's call it "/home/shared". I want to set UMASK to 007, so that by default, files are created readable and writable by user and group, with no permissions for anybody else. I changed a line in "/etc/profile" from "umask 022" to "umask 007". After rebooting the app server, the umask does appear to be 007 when you log in at the console. However, it doesn't seem to affect the terminals.

So I figured I needed to change it in "/opt/ltsp/i386/etc/profile". vi helped me out with that. Didn't make a difference in the terminals. Ok, I need to rebuild the image, so I did an "ltsp-update-image" and rebooted the terminal. umask is still 022. ???

I changed UMASK in "/opt/ltsp/i386/etc/login.defs" and rebuilt the image. No change. ??? I really don't understand why this isn't working.

How can I change the UMASK for users who log in on an LTSP terminal?

View 2 Replies View Related

General :: Change Umask For Files Created In Ext2/ext3

Oct 28, 2009

I have ext3 partition mounted on /mnt/shared/ as follows

Code:

Permissions above are of the actual mounted fs.

Goal is to have all files created on the fs
1) to belong to group 'users'
2) to have this groups permissions set to rw (rwx for directories) so that all users who belong to group 'users' have full read/write access to data and everyone else to have only read access.

Now because of setgid bit (s) in group permissions every file created has group 'users' and additionally setgid bit is set for directories. Because every users umask by default (on my system) is set to 0022 all created files will have permissions 644 for ordinary files and 755 for directories.

Net result of above means that users A and B who both belong to group 'users' won't be able to modify files created by the other.

So how can I make files created on the fs to be created always with umask 0002 WITHOUT changing default umask for users that is used elsewhere (like in their home directory) ?

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Umask And /usr/bin/umask ?

Apr 25, 2011

Not sure if this is the right place to ask this question. In Solaris we have umask (shell builtin) and /usr/bin/umask. However I could not find /usr/bin/umask in Linux.

I want to know the difference between both and how can we achieve the functionality of /usr/bin/umask in Linux as its not there...

View 6 Replies View Related

General :: Create User Add File With Default Password And Force User To Change It?

Feb 2, 2010

I want to add 50 new users, not on the server yet I want to add them all to group Accounting - with 1 option, not user by user I want to setup a default password for them all, and have it say something like 'You must now change password or no access will be permitted' Any other options I also want to do once, not for each user?

View 3 Replies View Related

General :: Change Password For Newly Created User And Root User Using Graphical?

Jan 15, 2010

I am using mint 8 for a 2 weeks, I am noob to linux but I like Mint than any other linux distro which is great alternative to windows. I have a problem regarding password reseting.

1. My laptop automatically get logged in without asking user name and password.

2. I tried to change password for newly created user and root user using graphical way but it does not work.

2. I can perform administrator task using only OEM user which is default inbuilt user of mint.

How can make my laptop to ask password when mint get booted? How to change password for other users?

View 1 Replies View Related

Ubuntu :: Create A New Administrative User Of Change The Current User's Group

Sep 3, 2010

This netbook only has a user with non-administrative privs on it and root user but I do not have root's password.Is there a way that I can create a new administrative user of change the current user's group so that it can do sudo commands or have more privs?

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Disable User And Change User Password Using SSH?

Oct 5, 2010

How do I disable and change the user password using SSH on a Linux

View 3 Replies View Related

General :: Change All Files Belonging To One User To Another User?

Jul 20, 2011

I'm looking for a Linux command that can change ownership of all files belonging to a given user,preferably in a targeted directory, to another specified user. My dream command would look something like this. chuser -R --olduser tom --newuser jerry

This is my scenario... I have a backup file (.tgz) with user and group information preserved in it. It was taken from a web server running Apache and MySQL. The files in the backup are from across the system and contain files from several different users and several system type accounts and it is key that when restored on the new server the settings are not lost. The problem is that the users on the machine the files are being restored to don't match the ones in the backup file. For instance both machines had a MySQL user but they have different user ids and there are several user ids that existed on both machines that belong to different users. This means there is no way to sync the users on the new machine to the ones on the old machine. I can find all the users files with the find command like this...

find /decompressed-backup-dir -uid 1050
or
find /decompressed-backup-dir -user tom

If, as I suspect, there is no way to do what I want with a single command then perhaps there is a way to pipe the results of the find command to another command to handle the ownership change?

I could do this with a PHP script but there are 4GB and tens of thousands of files in the backup so I don't want to use PHP or Perl but I would be happy with a shell script that could handle it.

View 2 Replies View Related

Software :: Change A Process Running In Root-user To Non-root User ?

Oct 28, 2009

Is It possible to change a process running in root-user to non-root-user by setting suid / uid / euid / gid etc... I so please instruct how, when and wat to set in order to change a process running in root-user to non-root user

View 4 Replies View Related

General :: Changing Default UMASK Value?

Jan 15, 2010

I am attempting to modify the default umask value under all accounts on my linux system to 002. This will hopefully allow both the account and the account's group access to the created files.

I have modified it within /etc/bashrc, however it seems to be making no difference on this default value. The files I create through "File Browser" all have the access rights set to 600.

Is there any error here, as all evidence I can find on the internet points to the bashrc file.

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Get Umask For All Users Using Script?

Feb 16, 2010

I am writing a bash script for auditing a Linux System. One of the points to capture is the umask of the users in the system.
Though a 'umask' command executed by the respective user gives this value, i am not sure how to get this in a script, which would be run with root credentials. This my be pretty easy, but i am not sure how root can find this for say 'user-x' (except say peeking into /etc/bashrc).

umask doesn't seem to accept username argument like the 'id' command does...

View 5 Replies View Related

General :: Set Default Umask For Users?

Jan 4, 2010

I think the following code is trying to change the settings inside the file:

CISum=077
sed -e "s/002/$CISum/" -e "s/022/$CISum/" /etc/bashrc-preCIS > /etc/bashrc
sed -e "s/002/$CISum/" -e "s/022/$CISum/" /etc/csh.cshrc-preCIS > /etc/csh.cshrc

[code].....

But, what if i only want to check what the settings are inside the file, but does not want any changes to the file.

View 1 Replies View Related

Security :: Umask For Cron And Other Log Files?

Mar 16, 2011

Does anyone have a solution for cron file permissions. I need them to be automatically generated 640, right not I believe they are 0644. Could I add a umask varible to the syslog.conf file to set the umask for cron generated files? Or is there a better way to do this. I am speaking only of logs generated by root.

View 1 Replies View Related

Fedora :: Umask, Chown, Chgrp And Other Commands?

Feb 7, 2010

ok so im working on homework and im not understanding what my teacher is wanting me to do and i dont have time to email him seeing as he might not read it until tomorrow. so ill copy and paste and if anyone can better explain it,

2) Use the umask command to change your file creation mask such that,by default for new files and directories you create, no permissions are taken away from the 'user' (owner), write permissions are taken away from the 'group' (group owner), and all permissions (read, write and execute) are taken away from 'other'. Take a screenshot of your terminal window showing the results of this step.

3) Use the touch command to create a new file called testfile. Use the ls command to display the contents of your current directory in long mode. Take a screenshot of your terminal window showing the results of this step. Ensure that the directory listing for testfile is completely visible in your screenshot.

4) Use the chown command to change the user associated with testfile (the owner) to cint201. Take a screenshot of your terminal window showing the results of this step.

5) Use the chgrp command to change the the group associated with testfile (the group owner) to users. Take a screenshot of your terminal window showing the results of this step.

6) Use the chmod command to change the permissions for testfile such that the 'user' (owner) permissions are set to read, write and execute, the 'group' (group owner) permission are set to read and execute, the 'other' permissions are set to grant neither read, write nor execute, and finally set the SUID bit for the file. Take a screenshot of your terminal window showing the results of this step.

7) Use the ls command to display the contents of your current directory in long mode. Take a screenshot of your terminal window showing the results of this step. Ensure that the directory listing for testfile is completely visible in your screenshot.

View 8 Replies View Related

General :: Umask Value In Machine Usually It Shows 0002 - What Is First 0 For

Nov 26, 2009

When I see the umask value in a linux machine usually it shows 0002. I understand last three digits (002 in 0002) what is first 0 for?

View 2 Replies View Related

Software :: Umask For Internal-sftp Users?

Dec 9, 2010

How do I set umask for sftp only users ?Users are jailed - that means they use internal-sftp:

Code:
# cat /etc/ssh/sshd_config
..........

[code]...

View 1 Replies View Related

General :: Apply Umask Settings To An Account That Doesn't Log In?

Aug 4, 2011

On my Ubuntu 11.04x64 server, I have service accounts running which do not log in and do not have home directories. These service accounts are responsible for running processes which are invoked as services.When these services created new files, I need them to be created with the permissions 664 (UMASK 002).I edited the /etc/profile umask setting to reflect this. I see that now my user account creates files which reflect this new umask setting, but the service accounts do not when I manually created files using their accounts (sudo -u serviceaccount touch newfile).

View 1 Replies View Related

Software :: Setting Umask For Incoming Sftp Users?

Dec 29, 2008

We have users that send files to our server via sftp... We normallyhave umask set to 022 but for these files we would like to force a umask of 002... I've tried to change in the .bash_profile but does not seem to make any difference...

View 1 Replies View Related







Copyrights 2005-15 www.BigResource.com, All rights reserved